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These suggestions are aimed at families, but are equally valuable to other caregivers and teachers.  Adaptations include strategies to optimize a child's use of vision, using textures and touch to provide clues, enhancing safety, and maximizing organization.

Source: FamilyConnect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

This 7-minute video was created by Elina Mullen, Ed.D. and demonstrates different types of equipment for various sports, such as hockey, racquet games, and more.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Barbara Cheadle's child-rearing advice for parents whose children have visual impairments.

Source: Future Reflections, 2004, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

This article suggests bringing a buddy to an IEP meeting, and also lists strategies for parents to try if it appears that the meeting will be stressful; also available in Spanish.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

In this webcast, Diana Autin presents family companion guides that include fact sheets, mini-guides and an IEP Meeting Checklist. These materials provide a framework to support the development of meaningful, appropriate programming for students with deafblindness. 

Source: Perkins eLearning

This site's state-by-state menu makes it easy to locate, in one place, agency contact information for Accessible Information Materials and National Instructional Materials Accessibility Standard(NIMAS) for your U.S. state or territory.

Source: National Center on Accessible Educational Materials

This 190-page report describes "the experiences of youth with disabilities … in their first 2 years out of high school." Their findings indicated that "up to 2 years after leaving high school, almost 8 in 10 out-of-school youth with disabilities have been engaged in postsecondary education, paid employment, or training to prepare them for employment." Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Source: National Longitudinal Transition Study

Identifies various types of transition assessment, guidelines for conducting an assessment, and criteria for selection of assessment tools.

Source: National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center (NSTTAC)

This document helps parents prepare their children for legal majority. It explains guardianship, the transfer of rights, and considerations about graduation.

Source: National Center on Secondary Education and Transition (NCSET)

A 10-page table that illustrates evidence-based practices that support implementation of in-school predictors of post-school success.

Source: NTACT

In this PowerPoint presentation, Dr. Mary Zatta talks about bringing a student's educational plan into alignment with state's curricular requirements, with specific examples from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

An overview of the service and how to get access to it. This page also offers many links to further information.

Source: The Audio Description Project

The history and structure of braille, with attention to the issues of learning braille as an adult; includes a discussion of finger sensitivity, and alternatives to braille.

Source: VisionAware

OSHA standards and procedures for protecting the eyes in the workplace.

Source: ISHN (Industrial Safety & Hygiene News)

Read the full page of resources here, and browse the links below for additional information specific to children who are blind or visually impaired, deafblind, or who have additional disabilities including visual impairment.

Source: Center for Parent Information and Resources (formerly NICHCY)

Definition of amblyopia, causes and treatment

Source: Prevent Blindness America

A program for children with visual impairments and additional disabilities shares its objectives, activities, methods, information on financial resources, and its impact on families; also in Spanish.

Source: International Council for the Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

AADB is a national consumer organization of, by, and for deafblind Americans and their supporters.

ABSF is committed to serving blind and visually impaired children and adults, giving them the opportunities and experiences that build confidence and independence that can last a lifetime.

Source: American Blind Skiing Foundation

Basic description of nystagmus, FAQs, information for parents of school-age children with the condition.

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