Science Resources

Science teachers of students who are blind or visually impaired will find advice, encouragement, and teaching techniques in this section.

This article describes a joint venture between Perkins School for the Blind and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, which provides students who are visually impaired with an interactive way to study oceanography.

Source: Perkins eLearning Accessible Science

This article introduces students who are blind and actively participating in various science projects, including digging for dinosaur fossils, examining soil, and measuring rainfall.

Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

This article introduces students who are blind and actively participating in various science projects, including digging for dinosaur fossils, examining soil, and measuring rainfall.

Source: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)

This site provides information about the vision care field, with resources on training, career and salaries as an optician.

Source: OpticianEdu.org

Maylene Bird and Karen Poston describe how to use brailled squares or dark lined large squares on a whole sheet of paper with binder clips to represent the dominant and recessive traits. They include diagrams that can be downloaded in various formats.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

This checklist of questions ensures that seniors get the information they need from eye care professionals.

Source: VisionAware

TSynopses of current research findings, with links to further information and full texts.

Source: Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation

This paper offers "suggestions for modifying science instruction and instructional materials to meet the learning needs of visually impaired students," with "relevant examples in physical, chemical and biological sciences"; includes discussion of policy implications, alternative assessment and educational technology.

Source: Electronic Journal of Science Education

Here you'll find low-cost adaptation kits to bring meaning to science lessons for students with visual impairments. MDW also provides training workshops for staff working with blind science students. Also on this page, the Out of Sight book of science experiments for grades 2-5.

Part of the Perkins Webinar series, this presentation provides an overview of the "5-E format" of an inquiry lesson, and discusses recent research on inquiry-based education for students with visual impairments.

Source: Perkins eLearning

This article describes people with visual impairments who have become successful in many scientific fields, including engineering, physics, oceanography, chemistry, and astrophysics.

Source: Access World, American Federation of the Blind (AFB)

This video clip from WSSB shows Greg Williams, Ph.D., from Independence Science discusses how to safely organize and set up a laboratory bench for students who are blind or visually impaired.

Source: Washington State School for the Blind

This article discusses the use of sound, touch, and smell to study nature and science.

Source: Natural History Education, Science, Technology (NHEST)

Geerat J. Vermeij, a blind marine biologist who teaches at the University of California at Davis, discusses what a blind person needs in order to succeed in science.

Source: Braille Monitor (2004) National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

This article describes a submersible audible light sensor, which is a hand-held device that emits an audio signal that tracks reactions in a solution in real time.

This site features recordings of space phenomena, exploration missions and SPACEthoughts, addressing questions about the vastness of the universe.

Source: Spacesounds.com

Resources offered by SET-BC, a program of the Canadian Ministry of Education, include Tech Tutorials on Access, Communication, Differentiation, Learning, and Vision.

Source: Special Education Technology British Columbia

A 51 page manual from 2000 full of tips for adapting science experiments for students who are blind or visually impaired. Written by Matthew Dion, Karen Hoffman, and Amy Matter from Worcester Polytechnic Institute. It includes sections on Teaching the Blind and Visually Impaired, General Guidelines for Making Adaptations, Laboratory Adaptations, Specific Experiments, and a Resource List.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

This 75-page manual has sections on the classroom, testing and evaluation, assistive technology, accessible computing, laboratory techniques, mentoring and advocacy, and principles of universal design to create accessibility for all.

Source: American Chemical Society Committee on Chemists with Disabilities

Sheryl Burgstahler examines some of the specific challenges that students with disabilities face in both gaining and demonstrating knowledge. She lists accommodation suggestions for students with visual impairments.

Source: University of Washington

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