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The focus here is safety, with specific suggestions for when a child starts to move around independently.

Source: FamilyConnect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

The 21st CCVAA is a long and complex document. You may find answers to most of your questions in this summary.

Source: Federal Communications Commission

Find tips to help you sort through why your child is displaying self-injurious behaviors and how you can help them stop.

Source: WonderBaby

Approximately 40,000 services and programs in Massachusetts for elders, including those with vision loss; aimed at consumers, caregivers, and professionals.

Source: 800AgeInfo

Swimmer Megan Smith describes how she uses her hearing to determine when to turn around at the end of a lap; her coaches share what they have learned from working with her. Competitive opportunities for blind swimmers are discussed.
 

Source: NFB/Future Reflections 26(2) 2007

A look at educational settings, curriculum, and some of the challenges in educating children with visual impairments

Source: National Federation of the Blind

A checklist of safety tips for lighting, furniture, elimination of hazards, use of color contrast, and safety in hallways and stairways.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

Krystyna Gawlik and Anna Zwierzchowska present a comparative study of the conditioning abilities of adolescents who are deaf and blind.

Source: Journal of Human Kinetics, 2006

Many people with visual impairments also have undiagnosed autism characteristics. Nancy Duncan discusses the importance of identifying and delivering appropriate rehabilitation services for individuals.

Source: VisionAware

Ardis Bazyn and Sheila Styron share advice, from the student's perspective, on how to make college a successful experience. They cover a range of topics, including Choosing the Right College or University, Using Disabled Student Services, Knowing the Laws that Affect You, Training and Recruiting Readers and Drivers, Working your guide dog on campus, Auxiliary Aids and Services for Students with Disabilities, and Contacting Advocacy Organizations of the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Source: American Council of the Blind

This Canadian website is mostly concerned with wheelchair use, and accessories and clothing for wheelchair users. This section links to a wealth of resources on a wide range of high- and low-tech devices and adaptations that can serve children of school age.

Source: 1-800-WHEELCHAIR.CA

This site provides a good overview on the effect of visual impairments on learning, types of assistive technology, and the kinds of accommodations provided at colleges. Includes a list of scholarships and grants.

Source: Affordable Colleges Online

Key elements of high quality services for multiply handicapped children, and shares examples from a range of service delivery models.

Source: International Council for the Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

A useful guide through the alphabet soup of educational terms and abbreviations. (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader)

Source: Community Crossroads NH

Checklists of signs and symptoms of vision impairments in children.

Source: Optometrists Network

Treasure Baskets are collections of real objects that encourage a child to explore different sensory characteristics. This article offers suggestions of items to include in the baskets and discusses some of the educational benefits for young children.

Source: Nursery World

This 185-page guide addresses the importance of self-determination, student involvement in the transition process, instruction and assessment, and much more (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader).

Source: Council for Exceptional Children

Contributing author and copy editor Danika Taylor addresses the history of the rehabilitation movement in this article from 2005's Braille Monitor.

Source: National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Written by an Occupational Therapist (OT), this 80-page document includes an overview of CVI, and information on the evaluation and education of children with CVI.

Created by a man with deafblindness, this information site is mostly for other people who are deafblind, but includes material for family members and service providers.

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