Social Studies Resources

In this section, teachers will find practical suggestions for making geography and social studies accessible for students who are blind or visually impaired. Included are tips for the classroom, ideas for activities, and techniques to adapt lessons and materials.

Aimed at parents, this page provides a brief overview of the challenges facing teenagers with visual impairment who are studying geography and history.

Source: Family Connect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

Challenges facing people with blindness or visual impairment in Sierra Leone, including barriers to full social inclusion.

Source: AfriCAN

The English title is “Curricular Adaptations and Creation of Services for Multi-handicapped Blind Persons in Chile”; in Spanish.

Source: International Council for the Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

Suggestions for creating tactile teaching aids, including clocks, a geometry kit, tactile maps, globe, chemical equation tiles, and more.

Source: Eyeway.org (India)

APH maintains program statistics on children with visual impairments, including types of schools/programs in which they are educated, and their preferred learning medium (braille, print, auditory).

Source: American Printing House for the Blind (APH)

Statistics are drawn from AFB and U.S. government sources, and organized by age, ethnicity, geography, and more

Source: National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Download this outline of the WBU’s comprehensive plan for the socio-economic integration of people with blindness, including a strategy for poverty reduction. From the General documents page, click the title Blindness, Poverty, and Development from the Development committee.

Source: World Blind Union (WBU)

Project SALUTE describes the hierarchy of communication symbols, from most abstract to most concrete. Color photographs of each of the eleven symbols are included; available in English and Spanish.

Source: Project SALUTE

A discussion of community-based rehabilitation, a description of projects in Uganda, and recommendations that are applicable to projects in other locations. Also available in PDF.

Source: Community Eye Health Journal

Organizational recommendations based on the experience of Sight Savers International in India; also available as a PDF.

Source: Community Eye Health Journal

The necessity of understanding and integrating local culture into community-based rehabilitation programs. Also available in PDF.

Source: Community Eye Health Journal

This chapter from Sustainable Development and Persons with Disabilities: The Process of Self-Empowerment introduces community-based rehabilitation and assesses its possibilities and limitations.

Source: Africa Development Forum

This overview of community-based rehabilitation has links to related documents, including a matrix for designing a CBR strategy.

Source: World Health Organization (WHO)

This 98-page guide helps program managers assess the local situation and create policies and programs. (PDF not accessible to screen readers)

Source: World Health Organization (WHO)

Census data on the impact of disability on families. Visual and hearing impairments are counted together and not differentiated.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

Demographic and economic statistics; includes prevalence, employment, earnings, poverty, household income, and housing, with break-outs by age, race, gender, and educational attainment. Choose U.S. or state reports, or search the database.

Source: Employment and Disability Institute of Cornell University

Disability statistics drawn from the 2000 Census. Visual and hearing impairments are counted together and not differentiated.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census

"Discovery is dedicated to fostering self-sufficiency in blind and visually impaired children and adults by improving their mobility, confidence, independence, and social skills through involvement in physical activities."

Some of the challenges, myths, and beliefs encountered in Kenya when addressing the needs of children with visual impairment and additional disabilities; suggestions for developing effective strategies.

Source: International Council for the Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

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