Social Skills Resources

Because so much social behavior is learned through observation, children with blindness or visual impairments need some assistance to find their place in the social world. In this section you will find suggestions to help their children make friends, play with others, develop a sense of autonomy, and learn how to interact and reciprocate. This section also presents information on behavior problems and their interventions.

Prof. Grace Lappin describes how infant massage can provide another way for the caregiver and child to interact, establish contact and communication, and develop a deep bond. (Microsoft Word Document)

Source: DVI Quarterly, 2003, Council for Exceptional Children (CEC)Division on Visual Impairments

Challenges facing people with blindness or visual impairment in Sierra Leone, including barriers to full social inclusion.

Source: AfriCAN

The AFB Senior Site has information on numerous topics, such as Understanding Vision Loss, Changing Your Home, and Daily Living.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

Authors Perla and Ducret explain how the design of an O&M program for students with multiple disabilities should start with understanding the child's most basic needs, such as communication, safety, independence, and consistency.

Source: International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

Colorado's state standards are listed here for grades K-12; a glossary and references are included.

Another useful list of reminders for behaving with consideration when interacting socially.

Source: Vision Australia

This self-study course in braille, designed for people with vision and presented in Spanish, was created by Carmen Roig and is available online at no charge. 

Source: ONCE

Aimed at parents, with clear, nonclinical language. This is a compilation of three different developmental scales for evaluating social/emotional, communication, cognitive, fine motor, and gross motor development.

Source: WonderBaby

Discovery is dedicated to fostering self-sufficiency in blind and visually impaired children and adults by improving their mobility, confidence, independence, and social skills through involvement in physical activities.

Source: Discovery Blind Sports

Prof. Michael Brambring studies the alternative strategies that blind children apply to accomplish tasks, then uses that knowledge to promote the acquisition of developmental skills. (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader)

Source: International Council for Education of People with Visual Impairment (ICEVI)

The CEC's Division on Visual Impairment and Deafblindness advances the education of children and youth who have visual impairments or deafblindness. Browse selected articles and position papers here.

Source: Council for Exceptional Children

This page offers suggestions for helping young children develop greater independence in all areas of daily living, including mobility, toileting, eating, dressing and undressing.

Source: Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB)

Advice for conversing, giving directions, and acting as a sighted guide, as well as guidelines for behaving with tact and consideration, and respecting the independence of a person who is blind.

Source: American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)

DVI's position paper asserts the need for "appropriate assessment, instruction, and adaptations" and sets guidelines for providing an appropriate education program for students with low vision.

Source: Council for Exceptional Children-Division on Visual Impairments (CECDVI)

Looking for activities that will encourage students to handle magnifiers and other optical devices? Here is a list of ideas that can also be encorporated in academic lessons.

Source: BrailleSC.org

This article explains how learning about communication and language differs for a baby who is visually impaired, and offers suggestions for helping your child learn to communicate.

Source: FamilyConnect for Parents of Children with Visual Impairments

This article has practical suggestions for parents of preschoolers for developing social skills.

Source: FamilyConnect

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