General Teaching Tips Resources

These resources for teachers offer advice, professional supports, and explanation of team roles and responsibilities in the education of students who are blind or visually impaired.

A look at educational settings, curriculum, and some of the challenges in educating children with visual impairments

Source: National Federation of the Blind

Krystyna Gawlik and Anna Zwierzchowska present a comparative study of the conditioning abilities of adolescents who are deaf and blind.

Source: Journal of Human Kinetics, 2006

Ardis Bazyn and Sheila Styron share advice, from the student's perspective, on how to make college a successful experience. They cover a range of topics, including Choosing the Right College or University, Using Disabled Student Services, Knowing the Laws that Affect You, Training and Recruiting Readers and Drivers, Working your guide dog on campus, Auxiliary Aids and Services for Students with Disabilities, and Contacting Advocacy Organizations of the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Source: American Council of the Blind

Treasure Baskets are collections of real objects that encourage a child to explore different sensory characteristics. This article offers suggestions of items to include in the baskets and discusses some of the educational benefits for young children.

Source: Nursery World

Marc Krizack describes the work of Dr. Dennis Fantin, a blind biophysicist who developed "a basic set of three-dimensional chemical and biological models to be used as educational aids for blind students enrolled in college courses in the physical and biological sciences."

Source: Disability World

This interactive website is full of practical ideas for hands-on lessons, resources, materials, and more. Subscribe to the blog, ask questions, and share your ideas with an online community of practice of educators interested in making science accessible to students with visual impairments.

Source: Perkins eLearning

This section of the interactive website includes information about products and instructional materials for teaching science to students with visual impairments.

Source: Perkins School for the Blind

In this webcast, Perkins science teacher Kate Fraser outlines teaching strategies and adaptations to make science lessons and activities accessible to students who are visually impaired. Find even more resources more at the Perkins Accessible Science website.

Source: Webcast, Perkins School for the Blind

"The AccessSTEM website is a space where K-12 teachers, postsecondary educators, and employers learn to make classroom and employment opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) accessible to individuals with disabilities, and share promising practices."

Dr. Bruce shares examples of action research studies that were conducted at Perkins School for the Blind.

Source: Perkins eLearning, Perkins School for the Blind

A project developed between Penrickton Center for the Blind in Michigan, Perkins School for the Blind, and the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired provides resources and a community of practice around the work of Dr. Lilli Nielsen and Active Learning. The site includes discussion of Active Learning principles, assessment, implementation, materials, equipment, and other events and resources. Active Learning is most effective for those with significant multiple disabilities and in the 0-48 month developmental level. 

This is an excerpt from Dr. Lilli Nielsen's book, Early Learning Step by Step. It outlines her Active Learning Approach and explains the importance of the learning environment for childen with visual impairments and multiple disabilities.

Source: Future Reflections, 2004, National Federation of the Blind (NFB)

Recorded video webinars on various aspects of Active Learning can be viewed here.

Source: Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (TSBVI)

Outlines Head Start policy and practice for accommodating and integrating children with disabilities into its programs.

Source: HeadStart

Evolving Universe and Feel the Impact are NASA astronomy modules adapted for students with visual impairments. Both include alternate student texts and tactile graphics cards. The SEE Project develops "Braille / tactile … space science activities and observing programs that actively engage blind and visually impaired students from elementary grades through introductory college level in space science."

Source: Initiative to Develop Education though Astronomy and Space Science (IDEAS)

This article by Lauren Lieberman offers some important guidelines for developing and adapting activities for people who are deafblind. Specific examples are included.

Source: National Center on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

In this PowerPoint presentation, Dr. Mary Zatta talks about bringing a student's educational plan into alignment with state's curricular requirements, with specific examples from the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness (NCDB)

Read the full page of resources here, and browse the links below for additional information specific to children who are blind or visually impaired, deafblind, or who have additional disabilities including visual impairment.

Source: Center for Parent Information and Resources (formerly NICHCY)

AAAS publishes the journal Science, as well as other publications. They have a large number of programs designed to bring science literacy to all. They have resources for businesses, scientists, teachers, and students. One of their many endeavors, Project 2061 has developed highly regarded science curriculum benchmarks. The AAAS signature program is called Entrypoint, providing internship opportunities in science, engineering, math, computer science and some fields of business for students with disabilities. Many program alumni are now working in the science fields.

Dr. Jan van Dijk describes his educational approach, including the topics of attachment and the development of communication.

Source: National Consortium on Deaf-Blindness

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