Orientation and Mobility for Adults & Seniors

Adults who lose their vision can learn how to travel safely and independently. These websites present advice and information about orientation and mobility—skills necessary for finding one’s way on foot, with a cane, a guide dog, or a sighted guide.
 
National Federation of the Blind (NFB)
This booklet is written by a cane traveler and covers aspects of cane travel, such as Getting the Cane Ready, Actually Walking Around, Public Transportation, and Times and Places without the Usual Landmarks.
 
VisionAware
Practical suggestions for modifications in the home and the environment to minimize tripping hazards.
 
VisionAware
The basics of orientation and mobility; includes a video.
 
VisionAware
AFB outlines the benefits and considerations of working with a guide dog.
 
National Federation of the Blind (NFB)
A primer full of advice and encouragement for adults who must learn how to get around independently after vision loss. Includes information about landmarks, public transportation, and using environmental sounds. (Requires Adobe 
 
VisionAware
This article explains upper and lower protective techniques, trailing, and orienting oneself indoors and outdoors.
 
VisionAware
Using a sighted guide; includes tips and an online video.
 
VisionAware
Frequently asked questions about walking with long canes.
 
VisionAware
A brief overview of the latest in portable navigational devices.
 

Orientation & Mobility for Seniors with Vision Loss: Organizations & Resources to Explore

American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)
The AFB Senior Site has information on numerous topics, such as Understanding Vision Loss, Changing Your Home, and Daily Living.
 
This site provides an overview on Orientation and Mobility Specialists including academic requirements and a resources section. It makes online Orientation & Mobility information easy to find for instructors and other professionals.
 
Instructor Dona Sauerburger has gathered articles on a wide range of O&M topics, including quiet cars, learning to use a cane, and teaching the use of visual and non-visual techniques.